Why even bother ???   1 comment

In the last few posts there were descriptions of cardiod sub array’s .

Turns out you need more processing and amplifiers to build them , knowledge to put them to good use (so you need a system technician) , measurement equipment for verification and calibration and a number of other things so in the end it all comes down to money . These set-ups are more expensive .

Because the Meyer sound loudspeakers are self powered you only need a processor like the Galileo 616 or its smaller brother but if you use other brands that are non-powered it can become a “bit” more expensive compared to conventional set-ups .

Also some of the cardiod set-ups need more space (a end fired for instance) so i compared the pro’s and con’s on a few set-ups (all simulations/predictions are done using Meyer Sound HP700 sub woofers).

END FIRED vs. a conventional stack of 4 subs . 

End fired front   End fired sub array mic @ 5mt front of array .

End fired back End fired sub array mic @ 5mt back of array .

Conventional Stack of 4 subs .

Stack of 4 conv back front  Conventional stack of 4 subs mic @ 5mt front of array .

Stack of 4 conv back  Conventional stack of 4 subs mic @ 5mt back of array .

Pro’s end fired sub array :

*About 14 to 15 dB difference between the front and rear . A end fired line cancels @ the back so less noize on stage . *Level difference compared to a conventional stack of 4 subs is about 2 db less .

Con’s end fired sub array :

*4 channels of amplification and processing needed when using a 4 sub array . *more physical space needed to build it .

Pro’s conventional 4 sub stacked array :

*It’s fast to build and only takes 1 channel of processing . *Using non powered subs usually takes 2 channels of amplification (can be 1 but takes you down to a 2Ώ load) .*Takes a lot less space compared to a end fired line of 4 subs . * A higher level in front of the array (+2dB compared to a end fired line) .

Con’s conventional 4 sub stacked array :

*Level at the back of the array is only 3,3 dB less then in front of the array . So a lot more noize on stage ! compared to a end fired line of 4 subs .

Reversed end fired / gradient sub array vs a conventional stack of 2 subs :

Rev end fired front Reversed end fired line / Gradient mic @ 5 mt front of 2 sub array .

Rev end fired back  Reversed end fired line / gradient mic @ 5 mt back of 2 sub array .

Conventional Stack of 2 subs .

Stack of 2 front Conventional stack of 2 subs mic @ 5mt front of array .

Stack of 2 back Conventional stack of 2 subs mic @ 5mt back of array .

Pro’s reverse end fired / gradient sub array :

*Addition in front of the array (about 1 or 2 dB difference compared to a conventional stack of 2 subs) . *A lot of level reduction at the back of the array .

Con’s reverse end fired / gradient sub array :

*Due to a “time” (phase) difference on the back sub this array can never be properly aligned with a main system and is always a compromise  . *It takes 2 channels of processing and amplification . *The “tonal” characteristic of this array is different from a stack of 2 subs (it sounds different) .

Pro’s conventional 2 sub stacked array :

*It’s fast to build and only takes 1 channel of processing . *Takes less space compared to a reverse end fired line . * A higher level in front of the array (+1 or 2dB compared to a reverse end fired line) .

Con’s conventional 2 sub stacked array :

*Level at the back of the array is only 3,2 dB less then in front of the array . So a lot more noize on stage ! compared to a reversed end fired line (average SPL levels are +20dB compared to a reverse end fired array) .

CSA array vs a conventional stack of 3 subs :

CSA Front  CSA mic @ 5 mt  front from a 3 sub array .

CSA Back  CSA mic @ 5 mt back from a 3 sub array .

Stack of 3 conv front  Conventional stack of 3 subs mic @ 5mt front of array .

Stack of 3 conv back  Conventional stack of 3 subs mic @ 5mt back of array .

Pro’s CSA :

*Addition in front of the array (about 1 or 2 dB difference compared to a conventional stack of 2 subs) . *A level reduction at the back of the array (average level goes down with about 17dB) . *Less phase problems when aligning this to a main system compared to a reverse end fired array (due to the difference in time/phase the phase stays within a 0° and 120° difference @ a large area of the frequency response . Also the level of the “not really in phase sub” is down @ the front of the array compared to the 2 front facing subs) .

Con’s CSA :

Needs 2 channels of processing and 2/3 channels of amplification . *The “tonal” characteristic of this array is different from a stack of 3 subs (it sounds different) . *Level is 1 or 2 dB less compared to a conventional stack of 3 subs .

Pro’s conventional 3 sub stacked array :

*It’s fast to build and only takes 1 channel of processing . * A higher level in front of the array (+1 or 2dB compared to a CSA) .

Con’s conventional 3 sub stacked array :

*Level at the back of the array is only 3,5 dB less then in front of the array . So a lot more noize on stage ! compared to a CSA (average SPL levels are +15dB compared to a reverse end fired array) .

On all cardioid sub array there is a limitation frequency wise . It works up to a certain frequency so you have to use low-pass filters to stay under the upper boundary of the set-up you build otherwise the level will rise on stage at frequencies past the upper boundary . 

 

One response to “Why even bother ???

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  1. Pingback: Subs in a line vs. a conventional Left/right configuration « Timo's World all around the globe

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